The Isanti County News http://isanticountynews.com The Isanti County News covers community news, sports, current events and provides advertising and information for the cities of Cambridge, Isanti, and Braham, Minnesota and their surrounding areas. Fri, 30 Jan 2015 14:58:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Wilfred (Willie) R. Norman http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/wilfred-willie-r-norman/ http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/wilfred-willie-r-norman/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 23:00:32 +0000 http://isanticountynews.com/?p=118469 Wilfred  (Willie)   R.  Norman

Wilfred R. Norman (Willie) of Cambridge, died on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at Ecumen North Branch at the age of 96.
He was born on December 10, 1918 to Erben and Esther Norman on the family farm, which belonged to his grandparents. It was the same farmhouse where his father was born. In 1920 his family moved to a small farm in Shevlin, MN. He attended school there until March of 1931, when his father purchased the family farm and moved them back to north Cambridge. He graduated from Oak Hill Country School in 1932. That fall he started high school in Cambridge and graduated in 1936. During those years he was very active in the 4-H Club. After high school he took courses in butter making and business at the University of Minnesota. After completing those courses, he was employed by the Cambridge Creamery Company for several years while continuing to work on the family farm.
Willie married June Sylvia Edblad June 7, 1947 at Cambridge Lutheran Church. While living in Cambridge, two sons, Mike and Mark, were born. They resided in Cambridge until 1952 before moving to Gheen, MN, where he worked at his father-in-law’s logging camp. While working there, one daughter, Teri, was born in Little Fork, MN. After two years they moved back to Cambridge where he was employed by and later managed the Midland Co-op Hardware Store. In 1966 he ran for the office of Isanti County Treasurer and won. He served in that position until retiring in 1985. He was active in his church and community. Wilfred was baptized and confirmed at Cambridge Lutheran Church. He belonged to the Lions Club, was active with Boy Scouts, served on the Cambridge Credit Union Board and the Memorial Hospital Board. He enjoyed pheasant hunting in his younger years. He also enjoyed agate and arrowhead hunting. Later on, woodworking, gardening, reading, fishing, golfing, antiquing, cards, and traveling became his hobbies.
Willie is survived by his wife of 67 years, Junie, sons Michael (Jodi) Norman, Sr. and Mark Norman, both of Cambridge, daughter Teri (Jon) Kukachka of Coon Rapids, MN; six grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, and two great-great grandchildren; brother Charles (Alice) Norman of Minneapolis, and sister Betty Walburg of Isanti, MN.
He is preceded in death by his brother Bruce Norman, brother-in-law Russ Walburg, and daughter-in-law Judy Norman.
Memorial service held at 11 a.m. at Cambridge Lutheran Church on Friday, January 30, 2015. Visitation one hour prior to services.
Arrangements in the care of Carlson-Lillemoen Funeral Home and Cremation Services of Cambridge. Condolences can be shared at www.carlsonlillemoen.com.

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How to Talk About Elder Care http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/how-to-talk-about-elder-care/ http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/how-to-talk-about-elder-care/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 21:00:02 +0000 http://isanticountynews.com/?guid=c3d6c41e7b07c175d41122ebf348c427 Emotions involved with caring for the elderly can seem almost as overwhelming as the finances. As your loved ones age, what topics must you be ready to discuss? Beyond money, you need to talk about independence and basic preferences for the way individuals want to live or die.

First, realize that you’re far from alone. According to the Genworth 2014 Cost of Care Survey, at least 70% of people older than 65 will eventually need some degree of long-term care (national median daily cost for a private room in a nursing home: $240).

Some ideas to get the conversation going:

Start with the most important priorities. Maybe this first conversation isn’t just about finding such documents as your loved ones’ will or health-care power of attorney (in case they become unable to make medical decisions), though you must eventually get to those. This conversation often begins with how you suddenly notice that your parent or other loved one moves slower, forgets more or clearly looks worse.

Jumping into money issues first is usually a mistake. Instead, consider dealing initially with immediate health and lifestyle issues.

Prepare questions in advance. You need some basic information: the location of important papers; how household expenses are paid; contact information on doctors and specialists; details of medicines; and whether your loved ones have a will, an advanced medical directive (similar to a health-care power of attorney) and a written funeral plan.

The latter specifies such details as desired types of services, viewing, the funeral itself and any memorials after burial. Also, does the funeral plan mention what money or burial insurance exists to pay for it?

Your family’s personal circumstances may necessitate dozens more questions. When creating this list, ask yourself well beforehand about everything you need to know if your loved one suddenly becomes sick or dies.

Be patient. In some families, a successful financial discussion comes only after several attempts and some frustration. Try to not become angry. Just keep starting the conversation until it catches on.

Plan a caregiving strategy together. Discuss your loved one’s preferences and trigger points for the various stages of care.

Recognize everyone’s limits. Most people almost always want to stay for as long as possible at home, but you must candidly address exactly how much you can manage at home as a caregiver and whether you might all need various services (such as a home aide, geriatric-care manager or an assisted living residence) during the different stages of aging still to come.

Writing down that information also saves terrible doubt and bitterness later.

Make sure everyone knows the plan. Once you settle on a strategy, make sure all family and friends understand both the plan and their assignments in it.

These conversations can take – as well as save – a lot of time, energy and love.

But having them while your loved ones are still healthy usually eases the burden for everyone if and when the moment comes for long-term care.

(See a video of my recent interview on this subject here.  This is an excerpt from a longer article that appeared in our firm’s recent client newsletter.  You can read it in its entirety here, beginning on page 2.)

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Eric Hutchinson, CFP, CLU, ChFC, is president of Hutchinson Financial in Little Rock and Bentonville, Ark., and in Texarkana, Texas. He frequently speaks on financial topics and has appeared on Bloomberg Television in New York and on local NBC, CBS, ABC and FOX affiliates. Professional affiliations include the Financial Planning Association, the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards and the Investment Management Consultants Association. His blog frequently features accompanying videos on that week’s topics. His e-book is The 250% Effect.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Emotions involved with caring for the elderly can seem almost as overwhelming as the finances. As your loved ones age, what topics must you be ready to discuss? Beyond money, you need to talk about independence and basic preferences for the way individuals want to live or die.

First, realize that you’re far from alone. According to the Genworth 2014 Cost of Care Survey, at least 70% of people older than 65 will eventually need some degree of long-term care (national median daily cost for a private room in a nursing home: $240).

Some ideas to get the conversation going:

Start with the most important priorities. Maybe this first conversation isn’t just about finding such documents as your loved ones’ will or health-care power of attorney (in case they become unable to make medical decisions), though you must eventually get to those. This conversation often begins with how you suddenly notice that your parent or other loved one moves slower, forgets more or clearly looks worse.

Jumping into money issues first is usually a mistake. Instead, consider dealing initially with immediate health and lifestyle issues.

Prepare questions in advance. You need some basic information: the location of important papers; how household expenses are paid; contact information on doctors and specialists; details of medicines; and whether your loved ones have a will, an advanced medical directive (similar to a health-care power of attorney) and a written funeral plan.

The latter specifies such details as desired types of services, viewing, the funeral itself and any memorials after burial. Also, does the funeral plan mention what money or burial insurance exists to pay for it?

Your family’s personal circumstances may necessitate dozens more questions. When creating this list, ask yourself well beforehand about everything you need to know if your loved one suddenly becomes sick or dies.

Be patient. In some families, a successful financial discussion comes only after several attempts and some frustration. Try to not become angry. Just keep starting the conversation until it catches on.

Plan a caregiving strategy together. Discuss your loved one’s preferences and trigger points for the various stages of care.

Recognize everyone’s limits. Most people almost always want to stay for as long as possible at home, but you must candidly address exactly how much you can manage at home as a caregiver and whether you might all need various services (such as a home aide, geriatric-care manager or an assisted living residence) during the different stages of aging still to come.

Writing down that information also saves terrible doubt and bitterness later.

Make sure everyone knows the plan. Once you settle on a strategy, make sure all family and friends understand both the plan and their assignments in it.

These conversations can take – as well as save – a lot of time, energy and love.

But having them while your loved ones are still healthy usually eases the burden for everyone if and when the moment comes for long-term care.

(See a video of my recent interview on this subject here.  This is an excerpt from a longer article that appeared in our firm’s recent client newsletter.  You can read it in its entirety here, beginning on page 2.)

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Eric Hutchinson, CFP, CLU, ChFC, is president of Hutchinson Financial in Little Rock and Bentonville, Ark., and in Texarkana, Texas. He frequently speaks on financial topics and has appeared on Bloomberg Television in New York and on local NBC, CBS, ABC and FOX affiliates. Professional affiliations include the Financial Planning Association, the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards and the Investment Management Consultants Association. His blog frequently features accompanying videos on that week’s topics. His e-book is The 250% Effect.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Unearthing Retirement Money http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/unearthing-retirement-money/ http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/unearthing-retirement-money/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 20:00:03 +0000 http://isanticountynews.com/?guid=cf924bc790eb0c1cdba58e69bb3612bb Now more than ever you must explore every detail of potential income for your golden years. Sometimes that takes a little legwork, the right questions and a willingness to admit that you don’t know the answers.

A few years ago, a firefighter in his early 50s, Keith, came to my firm. Keith spent his first 10 years of his working career on our local police force and switched to the fire department to finish his career. Soon after he arrived, we determined that Keith had roughly $80,000 in assets spread among a Roth individual retirement account, a traditional IRA and another retirement plan at Ohio Deferred Compensation, a supplemental retirement plan for my state’s public employees.

Keith knew he was going to get a pension, a potentially big bridge between his assets and his retirement expenses. He and his wife also put together a portfolio that matched the needs outlined in their written financial plan. Not until the final appointment did Keith ask me what I thought about Ohio’s Deferred Retirement Option Program (DROP).

The DROP is an optional benefit that allows eligible police officers and firefighters to accumulate a lump-sum of money for retirement based on a variable rate of interest. Enrollees can also purchase prior-service credit to reach eligibility requirements. I responded, “I think it’s great, if you’re eligible.”

Keith said that he did qualify but never enrolled. “Because I started being a firefighter later in life,” he explained, “I don’t have as many years in as others, so the only way to get enrolled [was] to buy back years from when I was on the police force.”

To think that a total of three appointments and roughly 12 hours of work took place and that we missed this instrumental detail of his retirement planning was relieving and exciting at the same time. I asked Keith if he was sure he had years to buy back.

When he left the police force, Keith sold all his pension assets to live on. He was able to buy those years back for the purposes of the DROP. Other financial advisors told him that they could manage his retirement money better than if he did buy back years to qualify for the DROP.

So why didn’t he mention it to me? “I was hesitant to ask you,” Keith said to me, “because I was made to feel stupid the last couple times I asked. But I wanted to make sure, so I thought I’d ask.”

In the past, my firm had other clients eligible for the DROP, and we knew it was an amazing program. I recommended that Keith and his wife visit to the Ohio Police & Fire Pension Fund, which oversees DROP, to find out how many years’ credit Keith might buy back and at what cost.

"Every day that you wait, the cost of buying those years back gets more and more expensive,” I told him.

Keith and his wife found out that buying back roughly eight years was about $72,000 – almost all Keith’s retirement savings. But as I assumed, the DROP account was projected to be worth more than $500,000 in slightly longer than seven more years. 

Keith was floored. He decided to liquidate enough assets to buy back the eight of his years on the police force. He only has about three years left before retirement, when he will collect the police and fire pension he originally expected plus another $500,000 to supplement his retirement income.

If not for digging deeper for the DROP, “I’d be working at the fire department when I’m 80,” Keith said.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Adam Koos, CFP, is an award-winning Certified Financial Planner, as well as founder and president of Libertas Wealth Management Group, Inc., a financial management firm, located in Columbus, Ohio.

Financial advisory and planning services offered though Libertas Wealth Management Group Inc, a Registered Investments Advisory Firm.

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. To determine which investment(s) may be appropriate for you, consult your financial advisor prior to investing. No strategy assures success or protects against loss.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Now more than ever you must explore every detail of potential income for your golden years. Sometimes that takes a little legwork, the right questions and a willingness to admit that you don’t know the answers.

A few years ago, a firefighter in his early 50s, Keith, came to my firm. Keith spent his first 10 years of his working career on our local police force and switched to the fire department to finish his career. Soon after he arrived, we determined that Keith had roughly $80,000 in assets spread among a Roth individual retirement account, a traditional IRA and another retirement plan at Ohio Deferred Compensation, a supplemental retirement plan for my state’s public employees.

Keith knew he was going to get a pension, a potentially big bridge between his assets and his retirement expenses. He and his wife also put together a portfolio that matched the needs outlined in their written financial plan. Not until the final appointment did Keith ask me what I thought about Ohio’s Deferred Retirement Option Program (DROP).

The DROP is an optional benefit that allows eligible police officers and firefighters to accumulate a lump-sum of money for retirement based on a variable rate of interest. Enrollees can also purchase prior-service credit to reach eligibility requirements. I responded, “I think it’s great, if you’re eligible.”

Keith said that he did qualify but never enrolled. “Because I started being a firefighter later in life,” he explained, “I don’t have as many years in as others, so the only way to get enrolled [was] to buy back years from when I was on the police force.”

To think that a total of three appointments and roughly 12 hours of work took place and that we missed this instrumental detail of his retirement planning was relieving and exciting at the same time. I asked Keith if he was sure he had years to buy back.

When he left the police force, Keith sold all his pension assets to live on. He was able to buy those years back for the purposes of the DROP. Other financial advisors told him that they could manage his retirement money better than if he did buy back years to qualify for the DROP.

So why didn’t he mention it to me? “I was hesitant to ask you,” Keith said to me, “because I was made to feel stupid the last couple times I asked. But I wanted to make sure, so I thought I’d ask.”

In the past, my firm had other clients eligible for the DROP, and we knew it was an amazing program. I recommended that Keith and his wife visit to the Ohio Police & Fire Pension Fund, which oversees DROP, to find out how many years’ credit Keith might buy back and at what cost.

"Every day that you wait, the cost of buying those years back gets more and more expensive,” I told him.

Keith and his wife found out that buying back roughly eight years was about $72,000 – almost all Keith’s retirement savings. But as I assumed, the DROP account was projected to be worth more than $500,000 in slightly longer than seven more years. 

Keith was floored. He decided to liquidate enough assets to buy back the eight of his years on the police force. He only has about three years left before retirement, when he will collect the police and fire pension he originally expected plus another $500,000 to supplement his retirement income.

If not for digging deeper for the DROP, “I’d be working at the fire department when I’m 80,” Keith said.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Adam Koos, CFP, is an award-winning Certified Financial Planner, as well as founder and president of Libertas Wealth Management Group, Inc., a financial management firm, located in Columbus, Ohio.

Financial advisory and planning services offered though Libertas Wealth Management Group Inc, a Registered Investments Advisory Firm.

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. To determine which investment(s) may be appropriate for you, consult your financial advisor prior to investing. No strategy assures success or protects against loss.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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2015 Budget Summary http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/2015-budget-summary/ http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/2015-budget-summary/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 19:27:53 +0000 http://isanticountynews.com/?p=118461 2015 Budget Summary

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Ordinance No. 595 http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/ordinance-no-595/ http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/ordinance-no-595/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:59:13 +0000 http://isanticountynews.com/?p=118455 Ordinance No. 595

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Bernice Georgina (Carlson) Strike-Boelter http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/bernice-georgina-carlson-strike-boelter/ http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/bernice-georgina-carlson-strike-boelter/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:55:48 +0000 http://isanticountynews.com/?p=118457 Bernice   Georgina  (Carlson) Strike-Boelter

Bernice Georgina (Carlson) Strike-Boelter, age 95, of Cambridge and formerly of Isanti, passed peacefully on January 27, 2015.
Bernice Carlson was born April 16, 1919, on a farm near Dalbo, MN. Parents were (Carl) George Carlson and Bertha Margaret (Danielson) Carlson. She attended the rural school at Dalbo (Lincoln school district 40). She attended Sunday school and church at Salem Lutheran Church, also in Dalbo, where she was baptized, confirmed and married.
She graduated from Cambridge High School in June of 1937. She stayed at home helping her parents on the farm for two years, and then worked in Minneapolis for about three years.
On April 4, 1942, she married George Strike, and they made their home in rural Isanti, where they raised their four sons – Ronald, Wendell, Norman and David. They were actively engaged in dairy farming until George’s death in 1988. The family attended Faith Lutheran Church and Bernice continued her membership there all her life. She taught Sunday school for 50 years, except for a few years when her children were born.
She was also a 4H leader, a member of the Cambridge Hospital Auxiliary, Isanti PTA, Isanti County Dairy Herd Improvement Association (DHIA), The Refuge, Faith Lutheran Quilting group and Lois Circle. (She made about 200 quilts).
She loved to bake pies and homemade bread. She was a busy seamstress and made most of her children’s and her own clothing. She raised a large garden and canned thousands of quarts of produce. Her hobbies were African Violets, writing poetry, babysitting grandchildren, and taking care of elderly parents. She also liked to entertain for Christmas, Thanksgiving, birthdays, etc.
One of the highlights of her life was her trip to Sweden in 1972, where she visited her mother’s birthplace, and met many of her relatives.
She was preceded in death by her parents, two brothers, Sivert Carlson (a WWII casualty) and Russell Carlson, and two husbands – George Strike in 1988 and Warren Boelter in 2002.
She is survived by her fours sons and their wives, Ronald (Karen) Strike of Round Lake, MN, Wendell (Linda) Strike of Marietta, CA, Norman (Karen) Strike of Isanti, MN and David (Debra) Strike of St. Paul, MN. She is additionally survived by one brother, Melvin Carlson, 10 grandchildren, 21 great-grandchildren and 11 great-great grandchildren.
Memorial service 2 p.m. Saturday, January 31st at Faith Lutheran Church in Isanti. Visitation one hour prior to the service at the church. Memorials preferred to Faith Lutheran Church and Habitat for Humanity. Online condolences can be made at strikefuneral.com.

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Reflecting on the life of long-time editor Evelyn Puffer http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/reflecting-on-the-life-of-long-time-editor-evelyn-puffer/ http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/reflecting-on-the-life-of-long-time-editor-evelyn-puffer/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:33:56 +0000 http://isanticountynews.com/?p=118449 Although her voice was soft and sweet, her written words were powerful, inspiring and impacting.

Evelyn Puffer

Evelyn Puffer

Evelyn Puffer, 75, retired long-time editor of the Isanti County News, died unexpectedly at her home in Cambridge Jan. 24, 2015. Puffer is survived by her husband, Jim, of 56 years, daughter Michelle, and many other relatives and friends.

Puffer began her career with ECM Publishers as a writer for the Isanti County News in 1976. She was promoted to editor a few years later and served in that capacity until her retirement in March 2006.

Puffer was involved in many community organizations during her career as editor. As a cancer survivor, one of the organizations she was passionate about was the Harbor Room Cancer Resource Center at Cambridge Medical Center.

“As I sit here reflecting on Evelyn, I recall the early days of a group of community members who wanted so dearly to bring a cancer resource center to Cambridge. I knew that Evelyn had had her own journey with cancer, so I connected with her to ask her for help,” said Sue Slater, founding member of the Harbor Room and past board member. “Right away she was excited, yet cautious because there had been attempts before to start a cancer resource center — and they failed.”

Puffer offered her services to the Harbor Room.

“I told Evelyn I needed her talented ability to tell a story — a written one,” Slater said. “You see, Evelyn’s full-body radiation treatment she had many years ago was robbing her of her voice. Most often you had to listen real hard to hear her speak, but you could hear her very clearly through the power of her written words. She was a gifted storyteller.  So, Evelyn did write a story; a beautiful, touching story of a woman’s one-time visit to Harbor Room in 2005.”

Slater invited Puffer to join the Harbor Room board of directors, and she accepted.

“Evelyn was one of our biggest assets — she was the face of Harbor Room. She walked that journey through cancer and could see the value in the support of your community with lessening your burdens,” Slater said. “Evelyn’s passion for Harbor Room came through loud and clear with the use of her hands and her keyboard. You don’t have to speak the loudest to be heard — you just have to know how to tell a story so everyone would listen.”

Puffer was highly regarded among ECM Publishers, as well as the state, for her coverage of the courts. Isanti County Judge James Dehn said he relied on Puffer’s input.

“Evelyn was my public conscious,” Dehn said. “She let me know what she approved of and what she thought I needed to work harder on. She helped me keep in touch with the community, and the issues the average person was facing. She will be missed.”

Dehn described Evelyn as a “champion for different causes.” He explained Puffer, along with Lois Oestreich from Herman’s Bakery, were instrumental in saving the Isanti County Historic Courthouse along Second Avenue in Cambridge. On July 24, 1980, the courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

“Myself, Lois and Evelyn were working tirelessly to save the historic courthouse, and Evelyn was our ‘unsung hero’ in saving that building; she was our silent partner,” Dehn said. “She was involved in that process from the beginning, and the three of us did that together.”

Dehn mentioned Puffer wrote the official proclamation for the cities, county and school districts to use regarding the annual “Do Not Provide Alcohol to Minors” slogan contest for students that’s led by Dehn each year.

“Evelyn was an incredible sounding board for me and tough decisions I have to make,” Dehn said. “She was always so much fun to talk to. She would often tell the story of how she sat on Orville Freeman’s lap when she was a little girl. Her folks were really active in southeast Minneapolis politics. She was a wonderful friend; both she and her husband, Jim.”

Isanti County Attorney Jeff Edblad applauded Puffer’s journalistic integrity.

“I always greatly appreciated how Evelyn showed such a strong interest in reporting on the local criminal justice system,” Edblad said. “While her stories were always fair and balanced to all involved, Evelyn was also able to tell the story while showing incredible respect, dignity  and compassion for victims.”

During Puffer’s tenure at the newspaper, she covered Cambridge City Council meetings. Cambridge Mayor Marlys Palmer jokingly said, “We couldn’t start the meeting until we saw that Evelyn had arrived.”

Palmer added: “I am so thankful for my friendship with my dear friend Evelyn. When I first met her I was so struck by her kindness and professionalism. Not only was she my good friend but a mentor for me as well. She worked with me on a lot of different committees, and it enriched my life, as well as many others. Truthfully, I don’t think I would have grown into such a committed community advocate and became a good part of the Cambridge City Council without her input.”

Puffer wrote stories that impacted the community.

“When Evelyn ‘retired,’ I told her that I expected to see her back in the government center doing research on stories for the Isanti County News involving the criminal justice system in two weeks,” Edblad said. “She laughed and said ‘not a chance’ before proving me wrong. She was able to hold out for four weeks. She was a giant in this community and her reporting on stories impacting the community left it a much better place.”

Palmer said she felt Puffer was a role model for the community, especially women.

“I think her patience and respect for everyone in this community really set her up as a role model for many people, including the role of women,” Palmer said. “I have seen many women in this community in the last 20 years take on the role of city council member, CEOs and committee chairs. There was something about Evelyn that she could almost empower you and give you the confidence to step into a position you may had not considered before.”

Puffer was known for her local editorials. Dehn said it was one of Puffer’s editorials in 2004 that helped launch and solidify the partnership between law enforcement, courts and bars to form the Isanti County Safe Cab program in 2006. Safe Cabs provides discounted rides to bar patrons if they need a safe ride home.

“The editorial Evelyn wrote about bars coming together, and forming partnerships with law enforcement and the bars, helped launch our Safe Cab program,” Dehn said. “The bars never thought they would ever receive praise for something they were doing. Her editorial helped raise the bar for this community regarding the importance in fighting drunken driving. Before her editorial, there had never been anything written positively about bars. She helped raise the bar’s awareness of public safety.”

Puffer will be missed by many in the community.

“For myself, I will always remember and honor the memory of Evelyn,” Palmer said. “I will remember her for all of the things she gave to us so quietly, in her own sweet way.”

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Braham One-Act breaks out ‘More sinned against…’ for contest hosting this weekend http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/braham-one-act-breaks-out-more-sinned-against-for-contest-hosting-this-weekend/ http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/braham-one-act-breaks-out-more-sinned-against-for-contest-hosting-this-weekend/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:31:18 +0000 http://isanticountynews.com/?p=118442 he 2015 Braham High One-Act troupe: Tech crew (kneeling, l-r) Timothy Adkins, Kassi Adkins, Jacob Magnuson, Liz Magnuson, Devin Shellito, actors (standing) Colton TenNaple, Danielle Buttgereit, McKenzie Larson, Meredith Rude and Jarah Sullivan. Photos by Greg Hunt

he 2015 Braham High One-Act troupe: Tech crew (kneeling, l-r) Timothy Adkins, Kassi Adkins, Jacob Magnuson, Liz Magnuson, Devin Shellito, actors (standing) Colton TenNaple, Danielle Buttgereit, McKenzie Larson, Meredith Rude and Jarah Sullivan. Photos by Greg Hunt

A moral drama was selected for this year’s Braham One Act season. More Sinned Against than Sinning? by Liz Dobson is set inside the confines of a jail cell– and inside the head of the central character.

Three Emotions Joy (Danielle Buttgereit, standing at left), Fear (McKenzie Larson) and Anger (Colton TenNaple) surround midwife Marianne (Meredith Rude) as the plot unfolds in Braham’s version of “More Sinned Against than Sinning?”

Three Emotions Joy (Danielle Buttgereit, standing at left), Fear (McKenzie Larson) and Anger (Colton TenNaple) surround midwife Marianne (Meredith Rude) as the plot unfolds in Braham’s version of “More Sinned Against than Sinning?”

“I play Marianne, a midwife in her late 50s. She lost her child when she was 15 and that’s how she got into the midwife business,” described Meredith Rude who takes on the lead role in the one act. “Later, she is aiding a woman in a family with several children who dies during childbirth. Marianne tells the family the baby was stillborn, and she ends up taking the child home with her.”

The plot keeps twisting, and the midwife ends up in jail. While in the cell, Marianne’s discussion or memories of her actions are with three of her emotions: Fear (McKenzie Larson), Anger (Colton TenNaple) and Joy (Danielle Buttgereit). Jarah Sullivan is also on stage as a prison guard.

Meredith Rude opens in the spotlight as Marianne, a prisoner alone with her thoughts in the Braham One Act “More Sinned Against than Sinning?” Rude and the Braham troupe will host the subsection contest this Saturday.

Meredith Rude opens in the spotlight as Marianne, a prisoner alone with her thoughts in the Braham One Act “More Sinned Against than Sinning?” Rude and the Braham troupe will host the subsection contest this Saturday.

Jennifer Lundin is the director of the Bomber One-Act. The Braham group will host the 4A North Subsection Contest on Saturday morning, Jan. 31 beginning at 9 a.m. which is open to the public. Six total performances will fill the schedule.

Milaca is the host site for the Section 4A One-Act finals Saturday, Feb. 7 for advancing schools from the four subsection contests.

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Falling Prices: the Downside http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/falling-prices-the-downside/ http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/falling-prices-the-downside/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:30:03 +0000 http://isanticountynews.com/?guid=ea26021901d9952a4306c7928cb00c2a Falling prices are a good thing for the cash-strapped American consumer, whose income on average has fallen to where it was in 1994as we’ve reported. But behind every silver lining, there’s a black cloud. We are risking a plunge into the abyss known as deflation.

Deflation is typically a sign that all is not well with the economy. Prices fall when the economy is so weak that consumer demand shrinks. When prices drop, profits decrease, stock prices flag, and unemployment and bankruptcies increase.

Consumers put off purchases and wait for prices to fall further, which contributes to even further deflation. Deflation was an issue during the Great Depression, and a recession has accompanied every period of deflation.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:Deflation-300x201.png

Raúl Ilargi Meijer of The Automatic Earth website says deflation “eats societies alive,” explaining that, “Deflation is not lower prices. Deflation is people not spending, then stores lowering their prices because nobody’s buying, then companies firing their employees, and then going broke. Rinse and repeat. Less spending leads to lower prices leads to more unemployment leads to less spending power.”

Very low inflation can also have a negative impact. As The Economist noted, “The most troubling effect of low inflation is on monetary policy. Central banks stimulate spending by reducing the real interest rate, which is the nominal interest rate minus the rate of inflation. This boosts investment and discourages saving, reducing the output gap. The real rate required to raise demand enough to balance investment and saving is called the equilibrium real rate.

“When demand is weak, the equilibrium real rate may be negative, and under low inflation it is difficult for a central bank to set a nominal rate that brings this about. And because nominal rates are in practice never less than zero (you can always just keep money in cash) deflation proper makes a negative real rate not just hard but arithmetically impossible: subtract a negative number (the inflation rate, in circumstances of deflation) from a number that has to be zero or higher and you always get something positive.”

On the surface, deflation does not appear to be a problem in America. But in today’s global economy, what happens in the rest of the world affects us, too. And much of the world is in a fright over deflation of the Japanese variety, which resulted in the famous “lost decade” (that is quickly becoming the “lost two decades,” with scant signs of recovery in sight).

In the 34 OECD countries alone (that’s the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development), the number where deflation is a problem rose from four at the beginning of 2014 to 13 by the end of October. And that doesn’t include problem-child Japan, because its consumption tax boosted the inflation rate above 3%. (Note: If you’re trying to improve your economy, increasing taxes is not a good way to do it, even if it you need to boost your inflation rate.)

Countries with deflation issues include Greece (big surprise), Estonia, Hungary, Portugal, Sweden, Israel, Poland, Slovenia, Italy, Spain, Belgium, the Slovak Republic and Switzerland. The inflation rate is less than 1% in the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, and it is threatening to go below 1% in the United Kingdom.

So if a majority of OECD countries have a deflation problem – or likely will soon – why shouldn’t the U.S. be worried about deflation?

Keep in mind that, as we’ve pointed out, the U.S. inflation rate has been significantly higher than the rate reported as the Consumer Price Index, when you factor out the cost of food and energy. Yes, oil prices have been falling, but that’s a pretty recent phenomenon.

In spite of lower oil prices, the only people in America who are worried about deflation are members of the Federal Reserve Board, who have been trying to push inflation up to 2% for years without success.

That’s shocking, as the Fed’s actions were unprecedented. Yet after $4 trillion in quantitative easing (its economic stimulus program using bond buying), the Fed has failed to achieve its 2% inflation goal – the needle on the inflation-meter barely budged.

Easy money policy creates inflation, because the greater the money supply, the less a dollar is worth. The dollar has been strengthening, though, since QE ended in October. With other countries turning to their own versions of QE in an attempt to ward off deflation, the dollar is likely to continue strengthening.

Like deflation itself, that’s good and bad.

With a stronger dollar, imports will cost less and American companies will likely need to drop their prices to remain competitive. You can travel to Europe now without taking a second mortgage on your home.

As baby boomers retire, they will likely spend less, and that could also contribute to deflation. But the children of retiring boomers are now in the workforce and, in many cases, are earning more and spending more, which helps balance boomer retirement.

While deflation remains in check, American consumers are likely thinking, “Bring it on!” But falling oil prices are a good illustration of the good and bad sides of deflation.

Dropping oil prices were an early Christmas present, giving consumers more money for discretionary spending – which they, in turn, spent on Christmas presents. While Christmas season sales were far from overwhelming in 2014, results to date indicate that they “met expectations,” thanks to lower unemployment and lower gas prices.

Conversely, regions of the U.S. where hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have created an economic boom will suffer because of lower oil prices, as the industry becomes a victim of its own success.

While the U.S. is expected to pass both Saudi Arabia and Russia this year to become the world’s largest producer of oil, there will be fallout. With the economy slowing down just about everywhere but in the U.S., the supply of oil is now well in excess of demand. Some companies cannot produce oil profitably at the new, lower prices, so they will go bankrupt or be sold, and they will shelve projects that were in the planning stages.

It’s like a going out of business sale – consumers benefit from lower prices, but the business and the jobs it represents are gone for good.

So falling oil prices will hurt some parts of the U.S., just as the strengthening dollar will crimp businesses that rely heavily on exporting.

So, as deflation spreads through Europe, political and economic leaders will likely see the need to do something about it. That “something” is likely to be some form of easy money policy, even though the European Central Bank has already pushed interest rates into negative territory, by charging depositors a fee.

Recently, the European Central Bank launched a massive ($1.1 trillion) stimulus program, buying bonds to flood the Eurozone with money. President Mario Draghi fears deflation and figures that the region’s stagnant economy needs a jolt. 

Among other things, QE in the eurozone would make the euro weaker, which would make the dollar relatively stronger. And that would further harm American exporters and bring the U.S. closer to potential deflation, by lowering prices of imports even further.

To date, The Economist notes, “The ECB has put its hopes in targeted loans to banks, purchases of covered bonds that began on October 20th and purchases of asset-backed securities that are yet to start. Those efforts have yet to change the market’s psychology by much, in part because they will not significantly expand the ECB’s balance sheet, which has been shrinking as banks pay off previous loans. Investors associate larger central-bank balance sheets with a greater commitment to lifting up inflation.

“If that doesn’t work, the ECB could directly buy corporate bonds. There is €1.1 trillion ($1.4 trillion) of non-financial corporate debt and €7.8 trillion of financial corporate debt outstanding. Buying up some of this debt would allow a significant expansion of the ECB’s balance sheet. The next step would then be purchases of government bonds.”

In other words, quantitative easing. But The Economist article quotes Michael Pond of Barclays asking: “If it didn’t work for the Fed, why should it work for the ECB?” That’s a question worth pondering.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Brenda P. Wenning is president of Wenning Investments LLC in Newton, Mass. 

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Falling prices are a good thing for the cash-strapped American consumer, whose income on average has fallen to where it was in 1994as we’ve reported. But behind every silver lining, there’s a black cloud. We are risking a plunge into the abyss known as deflation.

Deflation is typically a sign that all is not well with the economy. Prices fall when the economy is so weak that consumer demand shrinks. When prices drop, profits decrease, stock prices flag, and unemployment and bankruptcies increase.

Consumers put off purchases and wait for prices to fall further, which contributes to even further deflation. Deflation was an issue during the Great Depression, and a recession has accompanied every period of deflation.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:Deflation-300x201.png

Raúl Ilargi Meijer of The Automatic Earth website says deflation “eats societies alive,” explaining that, “Deflation is not lower prices. Deflation is people not spending, then stores lowering their prices because nobody’s buying, then companies firing their employees, and then going broke. Rinse and repeat. Less spending leads to lower prices leads to more unemployment leads to less spending power.”

Very low inflation can also have a negative impact. As The Economist noted, “The most troubling effect of low inflation is on monetary policy. Central banks stimulate spending by reducing the real interest rate, which is the nominal interest rate minus the rate of inflation. This boosts investment and discourages saving, reducing the output gap. The real rate required to raise demand enough to balance investment and saving is called the equilibrium real rate.

“When demand is weak, the equilibrium real rate may be negative, and under low inflation it is difficult for a central bank to set a nominal rate that brings this about. And because nominal rates are in practice never less than zero (you can always just keep money in cash) deflation proper makes a negative real rate not just hard but arithmetically impossible: subtract a negative number (the inflation rate, in circumstances of deflation) from a number that has to be zero or higher and you always get something positive.”

On the surface, deflation does not appear to be a problem in America. But in today’s global economy, what happens in the rest of the world affects us, too. And much of the world is in a fright over deflation of the Japanese variety, which resulted in the famous “lost decade” (that is quickly becoming the “lost two decades,” with scant signs of recovery in sight).

In the 34 OECD countries alone (that’s the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development), the number where deflation is a problem rose from four at the beginning of 2014 to 13 by the end of October. And that doesn’t include problem-child Japan, because its consumption tax boosted the inflation rate above 3%. (Note: If you’re trying to improve your economy, increasing taxes is not a good way to do it, even if it you need to boost your inflation rate.)

Countries with deflation issues include Greece (big surprise), Estonia, Hungary, Portugal, Sweden, Israel, Poland, Slovenia, Italy, Spain, Belgium, the Slovak Republic and Switzerland. The inflation rate is less than 1% in the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, and it is threatening to go below 1% in the United Kingdom.

So if a majority of OECD countries have a deflation problem – or likely will soon – why shouldn’t the U.S. be worried about deflation?

Keep in mind that, as we’ve pointed out, the U.S. inflation rate has been significantly higher than the rate reported as the Consumer Price Index, when you factor out the cost of food and energy. Yes, oil prices have been falling, but that’s a pretty recent phenomenon.

In spite of lower oil prices, the only people in America who are worried about deflation are members of the Federal Reserve Board, who have been trying to push inflation up to 2% for years without success.

That’s shocking, as the Fed’s actions were unprecedented. Yet after $4 trillion in quantitative easing (its economic stimulus program using bond buying), the Fed has failed to achieve its 2% inflation goal – the needle on the inflation-meter barely budged.

Easy money policy creates inflation, because the greater the money supply, the less a dollar is worth. The dollar has been strengthening, though, since QE ended in October. With other countries turning to their own versions of QE in an attempt to ward off deflation, the dollar is likely to continue strengthening.

Like deflation itself, that’s good and bad.

With a stronger dollar, imports will cost less and American companies will likely need to drop their prices to remain competitive. You can travel to Europe now without taking a second mortgage on your home.

As baby boomers retire, they will likely spend less, and that could also contribute to deflation. But the children of retiring boomers are now in the workforce and, in many cases, are earning more and spending more, which helps balance boomer retirement.

While deflation remains in check, American consumers are likely thinking, “Bring it on!” But falling oil prices are a good illustration of the good and bad sides of deflation.

Dropping oil prices were an early Christmas present, giving consumers more money for discretionary spending – which they, in turn, spent on Christmas presents. While Christmas season sales were far from overwhelming in 2014, results to date indicate that they “met expectations,” thanks to lower unemployment and lower gas prices.

Conversely, regions of the U.S. where hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have created an economic boom will suffer because of lower oil prices, as the industry becomes a victim of its own success.

While the U.S. is expected to pass both Saudi Arabia and Russia this year to become the world’s largest producer of oil, there will be fallout. With the economy slowing down just about everywhere but in the U.S., the supply of oil is now well in excess of demand. Some companies cannot produce oil profitably at the new, lower prices, so they will go bankrupt or be sold, and they will shelve projects that were in the planning stages.

It’s like a going out of business sale – consumers benefit from lower prices, but the business and the jobs it represents are gone for good.

So falling oil prices will hurt some parts of the U.S., just as the strengthening dollar will crimp businesses that rely heavily on exporting.

So, as deflation spreads through Europe, political and economic leaders will likely see the need to do something about it. That “something” is likely to be some form of easy money policy, even though the European Central Bank has already pushed interest rates into negative territory, by charging depositors a fee.

Recently, the European Central Bank launched a massive ($1.1 trillion) stimulus program, buying bonds to flood the Eurozone with money. President Mario Draghi fears deflation and figures that the region’s stagnant economy needs a jolt. 

Among other things, QE in the eurozone would make the euro weaker, which would make the dollar relatively stronger. And that would further harm American exporters and bring the U.S. closer to potential deflation, by lowering prices of imports even further.

To date, The Economist notes, “The ECB has put its hopes in targeted loans to banks, purchases of covered bonds that began on October 20th and purchases of asset-backed securities that are yet to start. Those efforts have yet to change the market’s psychology by much, in part because they will not significantly expand the ECB’s balance sheet, which has been shrinking as banks pay off previous loans. Investors associate larger central-bank balance sheets with a greater commitment to lifting up inflation.

“If that doesn’t work, the ECB could directly buy corporate bonds. There is €1.1 trillion ($1.4 trillion) of non-financial corporate debt and €7.8 trillion of financial corporate debt outstanding. Buying up some of this debt would allow a significant expansion of the ECB’s balance sheet. The next step would then be purchases of government bonds.”

In other words, quantitative easing. But The Economist article quotes Michael Pond of Barclays asking: “If it didn’t work for the Fed, why should it work for the ECB?” That’s a question worth pondering.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Brenda P. Wenning is president of Wenning Investments LLC in Newton, Mass. 

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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‘Small Actors’ fill C-I One Act stage http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/small-actors-fill-c-i-one-act-stage/ http://isanticountynews.com/2015/01/29/small-actors-fill-c-i-one-act-stage/#comments Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:28:07 +0000 http://isanticountynews.com/?p=118436 Members of the 2015 Cambridge-Isanti One-Act troupe (front) Hannah Haglund, Bekah Kortan, (Row 1) Sarah Titus, Mackenzie Kruse, Chloe Truebenbach, Lacey Johnson, Sadie Broll, Sophie Wahlstrom, Ian McVicker, Madeline Kohn, Lily Truebenbach, Celia Mellang, Jenny Skalicky, (Row 2) Dominic Neal, Dawson Bartels, Isaac Volker, Blake Olson, Andy Palmer, tech Tyra Anderson, tech Nicolle Ulrich, Director Kelly Fairchild-Fahrni. Not pictured: Assistant director Aaron Knudsvig. Photos by Greg Hunt

Members of the 2015 Cambridge-Isanti One-Act troupe (front) Hannah Haglund, Bekah Kortan, (Row 1) Sarah Titus, Mackenzie Kruse, Chloe Truebenbach, Lacey Johnson, Sadie Broll, Sophie Wahlstrom, Ian McVicker, Madeline Kohn, Lily Truebenbach, Celia Mellang, Jenny Skalicky, (Row 2) Dominic Neal, Dawson Bartels, Isaac Volker, Blake Olson, Andy Palmer, tech Tyra Anderson, tech Nicolle Ulrich, Director Kelly Fairchild-Fahrni. Not pictured: Assistant director Aaron Knudsvig. Photos by Greg Hunt

A tricky little play, Small Actors by Stephen Gregg, is the vehicle the Cambridge-Isanti One-Act troupe will ride for the 2015 season. Sadie Broll takes the lead role of Emily, a high school student who misleads her parents about which part she landed in a play. The fib snares the young lady in “this funny and touching play about the roles we play in theatre and in life.”

Things get a little thorny for Emily in “Small Actors,” played by Sadie Broll (left). Emily may have stretched the truth about landing the Juliet role in an upcoming school play. And her parents (mom Laura played by Sophie Wahlstrom and father Paul played by Ian McVicker) may have cancelled a big trip to make the play, along with inviting the whole darn family to watch Emily on stage. Whoops?

Things get a little thorny for Emily in “Small Actors,” played by Sadie Broll (left). Emily may have stretched the truth about landing the Juliet role in an upcoming school play. And her parents (mom Laura played by Sophie Wahlstrom and father Paul played by Ian McVicker) may have cancelled a big trip to make the play, along with inviting the whole darn family to watch Emily on stage. Whoops?

The Small Actors group will present its annual public performance this Friday, Jan. 30, 7 p.m. inside the Performing Arts Center. The Bluejackets will also host the 7AA South Subsection Contest on Saturday morning, Jan. 31  (also open to the public). The contest begins at 9 a.m., and the C-I troupe will take the stage at 2:30 p.m.

The two lead scoring presentations will advance to the Section 7AA One-Act finals Saturday, Feb. 7 at Duluth East.

Kelly Fahrni-Fairchild is once against directing a large Cambridge-Isanti cast for Small Actors.

A quick-paced “Romeo & Juliet” is the play within the “Small Actors” one-act play, with Lacey Johnson landing the Juliet role and Blake Olson being Romeo.

A quick-paced “Romeo & Juliet” is the play within the “Small Actors” one-act play, with Lacey Johnson landing the Juliet role and Blake Olson being Romeo.

“There are so many levels to this play. It is humorous, but with a message from which we can all learn. It is about loss and reconciliation; mistakes and forgiveness,” she said  regarding the selection for the season. “I love the challenges that it offers as it transitions from one scene to another, and from fast motion, to rewind, to slow motion action. We retell Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet in less than three minutes, and the main character’s life spirals out of control because of one lie.”

Sadie Broll as Emily is among the actors taking the curtain call.

Sadie Broll as Emily is among the actors taking the curtain call.

Last weekend, the Mississippi 8 Festival was hosted at CIHS. The Bluejacket troupe received a Star Rating with four out of  four director’s choosing it as a high quality production. Receiving All-Conference awards were: Broll, Madeline Kohn, Jenny Skalicky, Sophie Wahlstrom. All-Conference Honorable Mention went to: Tyra Anderson, Nicole Ulrich, Ian McVicker, and Lily Truebenbach. The team also received an Academics Silver Level award.

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