Cambridge proclaims Community-Wide Read months

The city of Cambridge is one again gearing up for the 10th annual Cambridge Community-Wide Reading Program.

Cambridge Mayor Marlys Palmer proclaimed March and April 2017 for the One Book, One Community 2017 Reading Program during the March 20 City Council meeting. Pictured in front are Judith Kissner from Scout and Morgan Books, Palmer and Cambridge Branch librarian Nancy Dunbar. In back are Council Members Jim Godfrey, Lisa Iverson, Kersten Barfknecht Conley and Joe Morin. Photos by Rachel Kytonen
Cambridge Mayor Marlys Palmer proclaimed March and April 2017 for the One Book, One Community 2017 Reading Program during the March 20 City Council meeting. Pictured in front are Judith Kissner from Scout and Morgan Books, Palmer and Cambridge Branch librarian Nancy Dunbar. In back are Council Members Jim Godfrey, Lisa Iverson, Kersten Barfknecht Conley and Joe Morin. Photos by Rachel Kytonen

During the Cambridge City Council meeting Monday, March 20, Cambridge Mayor Marlys Palmer proclaimed March and April 2017 as dedicated to the One Book, One Community 2017 Reading Program.
Cambridge Branch librarian Nancy Dunbar explained “Good Night, Mr. Wodehouse,” by Minnesota author Faith Sullivan, has been selected as the novel for this year’s Community-Wide Read.

“We do this annual event because we want community members to engage in literary discussions and literary events, and we encourage community participation,” Dunbar said. “We invite all of you to come and attend all of the events. It’ll be a great time.”

Dunbar highlighted the four different community events that will be held as part of the reading program. She explained book discussions will be held at 6:30 p.m. April 13 at North Folk Winery and at 6:30 p.m. April 20 at the Cambridge Public Library. A book signing event with Sullivan will be held from 4-5 p.m. April 27 at Scout and Morgan Books in Cambridge.

The final event of the reading program will be held at 7 p.m. April 27 at the Isanti County Historical Society Heritage Center. Sullivan will be the guest speaker as she discusses her novel. Cake and refreshments will be served during this event.

The Community-Wide Reading Program is sponsored by the Cambridge Branch of the East Central Regional Library, Friends of the Cambridge Library, Rotary Club of Cambridge-Isanti, District 911 Community Education, Isanti County Historical Society, Thrivent Financial and Scout and Morgan Books.

During the March 20 Cambridge City Council meeting, Isanti County Attorney Jeff Edblad’s state and local government class at Anoka-Ramsey Community College Cambridge Campus attended the meeting and asked questions of the council. Pictured on the far left is Edblad along with his students and members of the City Council.
During the March 20 Cambridge City Council meeting, Isanti County Attorney Jeff Edblad’s state and local government class at Anoka-Ramsey Community College Cambridge Campus attended the meeting and asked questions of the council. Pictured on the far left is Edblad along with his students and members of the City Council.

“Good Night, Mr. Wodehouse” can be purchased at Scout and Morgan Books or checked out at the Cambridge Public Library.

Council adopts social media ordinance
By a vote of 4-1, with Council Member Jim Godfrey voting against, the council adopted an ordinance regulating restrictions on the use of the name “City of Cambridge” and the city’s official seal and logo.

City Administrator Lynda Woulfe explained the council has been discussing the issue for a couple of months and the city attorney has looked over the ordinance for consideration of adoption.

As far as regulations governing use, the ordinance reads: “It shall be unlawful for any person to use the name, logos, or official seal of the city of Cambridge, whether directly or indirectly, expressly or by implication, that creates the perception that the city, and/or its departments, agencies or programs, are involved in, or supports or endorses in any way, a person or organization in any pursuit, activity, or thing of any kind whatsoever, including but not limited to causes or events.”

As for penalties for the ordinance, Woulfe explained the city may issue an administrative citation that includes fines of up to $200 per day with a maximum fine of $2,000. She also noted the person receiving the citation has the right to appeal through an administrative judge process.

Godfrey said he feels the city is playing “Facebook Whac-A-Mole,” by adopting the ordinance.

“I think this will waste time of our staff that is more of a freedom of speech issue,” Godfrey said.
Woulfe explained the ordinance will require dedicated staff time, but explained the ordinance was discussed at the council retreat, and it’s about protecting the brand, image and name of the city, and making sure the city name, logo and seal are being used appropriately.

In other action, the council approved:
• Accepting a $2,000 grant from the East Central Regional Arts Council, proposed budget, and reservations via credit cards, which will include a $1 credit card processing fee. The grant will be used for a July Painting in the Park Series for both adults and children.

• Accepting a $15,000 Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund Grant and allocating up to an additional $4,000 for the 2017 Summer Arts in Parks Series. The funds will be used for seven June concerts to be held in City Park and the showing of four films in August to be held in various city parks.

• An ordinance creating a Sister Cities Commission and providing a formal framework for the commission. Woulfe explained that just like the city’s other commissions, a formal budget for the Sister Cities Commission will be set during the council’s annual budgeting process.