Cambridge Primary enjoys record turnout at Math Night

Student Sydney weighs bananas during the Cambridge-Isanti School Board Showcase held during the Nov. 21 board meeting. The showcase highlighted Cambridge Primary School’s Math Night recently held at Cub Foods. Also pictured is student Blake, as well as Board Member Darcy Winsor (left), Kate Bickford (center) and Board Member Lynn Wedlund (right).

Student Sydney weighs bananas during the Cambridge-Isanti School Board Showcase held during the Nov. 21 board meeting. The showcase highlighted Cambridge Primary School’s Math Night recently held at Cub Foods. Also pictured is student Blake, as well as Board Member Darcy Winsor (left), Kate Bickford (center) and Board Member Lynn Wedlund (right). Photos by Rachel Kytonen

Nearly 300 people occupied Cub Foods Nov. 19 to participate in Math Night hosted by Cambridge Primary School.

During the Cambridge-Isanti School Board meeting Nov. 21, Tanya Siedlecki, academic math coach at Cambridge Primary and Cambridge Intermediate Schools, explained the goal of Math Night is to bring students and families together, to practice math skills the students have learned in school, to use math in a real world setting and to share ways parents can integrate math into daily routines.

Siedlecki said 89 students and 188 family members attended Math Night, making it the highest turnout ever. She said Cub Foods was a gracious host, provided cookies and refreshments to the families, and helped set up tables. She said Cub Foods is willing to host the event again.

Siedlecki said each student received a color-coded worksheet based on their grade and then went off with their families to perform various tasks.

A wide variety of assignments were performed that included:

Board Members Gary Hawkins (by display board) and Mike Streiff work on reading a bar graph with student Elliot during the showcase.

Board Members Gary Hawkins (by display board) and Mike Streiff work on reading a bar graph with student Elliot during the showcase.

Counting orange segments: Writing numbers 1 to 1,000, using addition strategies and solving addition story problems.

Counting coins: Counting by 2s, 5s and 10s, identifying pennies, nickels and dimes, and finding the value of a group of coins up to $1.

Bar graphs: Reading and making a bar graph and comparing words to describe two or more numbers.

Candy comparison: Estimating sums up to 100 and comparing numbers up to 1,000.

Reading shelf labels: Writing and reading numbers, putting whole numbers in order and comparing numbers.

Tally chart: Making and reading a tally chart.

Weighing produce: Telling which objects are heavier, lighter or the same, and writing and comparing numbers.

Shape walk: Finding squares, circles, triangles, trapezoids, hexagons and rectangles, and finding cubes, cones, cylinders and spheres.

Siedlecki said the feedback she received from parents and students included: “very well organized and great activities”; “this was a great way to connect to the community — great, ‘real life’ math experience”; “this was wonderful”; “loved the idea”; “great job”; and “fun idea — nice to show all my kids math in the real world.”

“People were having fun and excited throughout the entire event,” Siedlecki said. “Also, big thanks to Cub Foods. They were wonderful and very inviting.”

Student Garon shows Superintendent Ray Queener (left) and Board Chair Tim Hitchings a math activity during the Nov. 21 School Board meeting showcase

Student Garon shows Superintendent Ray Queener (left) and Board Chair Tim Hitchings a math activity during the Nov. 21 School Board meeting showcase

Interest rate leads to saving

Patty Heminover, vice president of Springsted Inc., reported the results on the $3.06 million alternative facilities bond sale the district recently held.

Heminover reported the district received six competitive bids for the bond sale.

When estimating the interest rate the district would receive for the sale, Heminover said it was estimated at 2.57 percent. However, she explained the winning bidder, Piper Jaffray, gave the district an interest rate of 2.01 percent, which results in a $187,000 savings to the district.

Heminover also noted Piper Jaffray will be covering the closing costs for the district. She said what this means is the district will receive $3.06 million, but will only be required to pay back $2.94 million.

Heminover noted the district will also save between $400,000 to $500,000 due to the district holding two different bond sales for the $3.06 million bond and $10 million bond in two different calendar years. The district will hold a separate bond sale at a future date regarding the $10 million bond referendum that was passed by voters Nov. 5.

Heminover said the district will close on the $3 million bond sale Dec. 19.

“You really had an outstanding sale on your $3 million alternative facilities bond sale,” Heminover said. “There was a lot of competition on this sale. The savings you see have to do with the great credit score of the district. I would like to thank Finance Director Robyn Vosberg-Torgerson, as well as Superintendent Dr. Ray Queener for all their work on this as well. Everything goes a lot easier when you have wonderful staff to work with.”

In other action:

• Queener presented the district’s 2013-14 district goals, as well as an outline for strategic planning.

• The board approved the principal contract, as well as the administrators, directors and managers contract for 2013-15. Chair Tim Hitchings explained the contracts call for a 4.01 percent total package increase.

• The board thanked Queener for his hard work on the successful bond referendum. Queener also publicly thanked the community for their support of the referendum.

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