Cambridge makes new police chief feel at home

With his family by his side, Tim Dwyer is sworn in as the new Cambridge Police Chief during the Cambridge City Council meeting May 6. Dwyer and Cambridge Mayor Marlys Palmer shake hands following the oath of office. Pictured, from left, are Dwyer’s wife Terri, and children, Allison, 11, Aaron, 17, and Abby, 14. Photo by Rachel Kytonen

With his family by his side, Tim Dwyer is sworn in as the new Cambridge Police Chief during the Cambridge City Council meeting May 6. Dwyer and Cambridge Mayor Marlys Palmer shake hands following the oath of office. Pictured, from left, are Dwyer’s wife Terri, and children, Allison, 11, Aaron, 17, and Abby, 14. Photo by Rachel Kytonen

The city of Cambridge has a new police chief.

During the Cambridge City Council meeting May 6, with family by his side, Tim Dwyer was officially sworn in as the new police chief. His first day with the city was April 29.

Dwyer was most recently a captain with the Ramsey Police Department, and has over 24 years of law enforcement experience, having worked in a wide array of policing and speciality positions. He has been a captain with the Ramsey Police Department since 2002 and has been with the department since 1990.

“We are very fortunate you were able to come here, and we are fortunate such a good person applied for the position,” said Cambridge Mayor Marlys Palmer. “The city of Cambridge and its city council congratulates you on becoming the new police chief. The working relationship between the police department and the city of Cambridge is absolutely excellent, and that is one thing we looked at during the interview process. We hope this is a partnership that lasts for many years.”

For 10 weeks, Dwyer attended an intensive management and leadership program with Northwestern University’s School of Police Staff and Command and completed the program in May 2012.

During this time, Dwyer and his classmates had the chance to take master level courses in management and management theory, organizational behavior, human resource for law enforcement, budgeting, staffing allocations and personnel deployment.

Earlier in the day on May 6, an open house for Dwyer was held in the council chambers that was well attended by law enforcement officials and members of the public.

Bid awarded for wastewater treatment facility improvements

City Engineer Todd Blank of SEH explained bids were opened April 22 for the wastewater treatment facility improvements. Four bids were received for the project.

After discussion, the council awarded the low bid in the amount of $11,935,000 to the Robert L. Carr Company from Marshall, Minn.

Based on the information submitted with their bid form, Blank said SEH has determined that the Carr Company meets the minimum contractar qualifications, having completed a few water and wastewater treatment facility projects in the last five years — including the Waseca wastewater plant with a contract amount of $10.8 million.

Blank said SEH followed up with several project references and has concluded that the Carr Company has sufficient experience for the project. References stated that Robert L. Carr was fair with change order pricing, did not look for change orders  and was thorough with their work.

The council also approved a construction services agreement with SEH regarding the project. The contract will be based on an hourly basis, for an estimated maximum fee of $872,000.

Blank explained work will begin in about a month, and it’s an 18-month project.

Sidewalk Cafes

City Planner Marcia Westover explained staff was approached by the owner of American Jane’s Grill & Bar (former Cambridge American Legion) to consider sidewalk dining.

Westover explained sidewalk cafe dining as proposed would be allowed on the public sidewalks with certain limitations.

An application with a site plan would be reviewed by staff, and a 40-inch clearance would be required for pedestrian use. Sidewalk cafe accessories (tables, chairs, etc.) would need to be removed from the sidewalk at 10 p.m. and must not be put out before 10 a.m. each day.

In order to allow for proper snow removal, the sidewalk cafe’s may only be open from April 1 to Oct. 15. Trash and debris must be removed each day, and no signage will be allowed in the cafe area.

Westover explained a scaled diagram will be required to be submitted with information as requested on the application, including but not limited to: the dimensions of the sidewalk cafe area, existing fixtures or other obstacles, dimension from sidewalk cafe to curb, position of tables, chairs, plant boxes and anything else to be placed on the sidewalk, and the width of the sidewalk remaining for pedestrian use (40 inches or more required).

In the case of establishments holding beer, wine or liquor licenses and wishing to serve alcohol in the sidewalk cafe, the diagram shall be considered a description of the extended premises for purposes of the request to amend the beer, wine or liquor license.

Following discussion, the council approved the ordinance to allow for sidewalk cafes.

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