B.T. Johnson’s art exhibit “Learn to be wrong” on display

Cambridge Center for the Arts is proud to host an exhibition from local artist B.T. Johnson, a master of the eclectic and outlandish with a healthy dose of social commentary.

“The psychic energy that pushed them out was from the trapped, slow insanity and frustration that I, as many Americans, felt and feel, each day, roaring down the highway to work.” - B.T. Johnson on his graphite drawings

“The psychic energy that pushed them out was from the trapped, slow insanity and frustration that I, as many Americans, felt and feel, each day, roaring down the highway to work.” – B.T. Johnson on his graphite drawings

Johnson’s talent has evolved from many different mediums. First, his painted pallets—work he did in the 1980s while living and showcasing in New York—to his black and white graphite line drawings that simultaneously elicit confusion and awe.

In 2006, he developed a method of melting to create his colored pieces using crayon, pastel and charcoal over a plaster spackle base. Lastly, his sculptures are made of found objects, concrete and metals to weave intricate stories in a stream of consciousness fashion. Using old circuit boards juxtaposed with old photographs is not out of the norm for Johnson.

This ongoing exhibit is installed until Dec. 15. The community is invited an artist reception at the gallery location, 144 2nd Ave. SE, Cambridge, on Saturday, Dec. 1., from 4 to 6 p.m.

up arrow