Cambridge celebrates opening of 2nd Ave. bridge

By Rachel Kytonen

The city of Cambridge celebrated the opening of the new 2nd Ave. bridge during a ribbon cutting ceremony Monday, Nov. 14.

Gathering for the 2nd Ave. Bridge Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Nov. 14 are, from left, Cambridge City Council members Lisa Iverson and Chris Caulk, Bruce Reihl with Lunda Construction, frequent bridge walker Bonnie Boese and Deidre Peaslee from Anoka Ramsey Community College Cambridge Campus, Cambridge Mayor Marlys Palmer, Public Works Director Steve Wegwerth, City Engineer Todd Blank, Representative Kurt Daudt and Cambridge Area Chamber of Commerce President Nicki Klanderud. Photo by Rachel Kytonen

Gathering for the ribbon cutting celebration included Cambridge Mayor Marlys Palmer and members of the city council, Cambridge city staff, Representative Kurt Daudt, members of the Cambridge Area Chamber of Commerce, members of Anoka Ramsey Community College Cambridge Campus, local business owners, interested citizens, members of Lunda Construction and more.

“This reconstruction project has been very eagerly anticipated by the citizens of Cambridge, and also has been one of the largest local tourist attractions in the city all summer,” said Cambridge Mayor Marlys Palmer.

Palmer explained the bridge was originally built in 1922 when the road used to be Hwy. 95. The bridge needed to be reconstructed as it was deemed “structurally deficient.” It also needed to be repaired to avoid a 14-mile detour when the Hwy. 95 bridge is repaired.

Citizen Bonnie Boese, who works at the Cambridge Campus, was excited about the new bridge and uses it daily to walk to work. Boese was the first citizen to “officially” walk across the new bridge with her dogs on Monday afternoon.

Palmer thanked all the hard work of Lunda Construction, City Engineer Todd Blank, Public Works Director Steve Wegwerth, City Administrator Lynda Woulfe, City Finance Director Caroline Moe, the entire Cambridge City Council and the citizens of Cambridge.

Palmer explained the bridge cost $1,320,451, and state bonding funding contributed $611,417 to the project.

“I’m happy to report this project is paid in full,” Palmer said.

The new bridge is wider, has lighting, and a sidewalk for pedestrians to enjoy and to cross the bridge safely.

Citizen Bonnie Boese, who works at the Cambridge Campus, was excited about the new bridge and uses it daily to walk to work.

Boese was the first citizen to “officially” walk across the new bridge with her dogs on Monday afternoon.

The 2nd Avenue bridge

  • Norm Erickson

    I caught smallmouth bass below the old Hwy 95 bridge in 1959, during my lunch break at the Leader Store. Orley Eastlund let me keep them in his cooler so I could take them home fresh for dinner.

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